What are High School Counselors Looking for From Higher-Ed Institutions?

As most higher-ed institutions are well aware, High School Counselors are a crucial source to disseminate information to prospective college and university students.  These key “influencers” can help their students not only in the college application process, but can be a key factor in helping them choose which schools and programs are a fit for their particular backgrounds.

How and what information to provide these Counselors though provides a huge challenge to the higher-ed industry.

According to a nationwide survey of High School Counselors conducted by Ruffalo Noel Levitz, a leading provider of technology-enabled solutions and services for enrollment, student success, and fundraising in the higher education industry, there are several factors that most influence a Counselor’s decision to refer a particular College or University.  According to the survey, 99.5% of Counselors are influenced by what programs the schools have to offer that would be of interest to their students with 97.2% influenced by the quality of these programs.  Another 95.5% are influenced by the availability of financial aid and scholarships followed by 92.8% that find cost to be another important factor.  This is followed by factors from quality of the school down to social life.

Another important part of the equation in reaching High School Counselors is by what method do they prefer to receive this information.  By an overwhelming majority over 70% surveyed preferred to receive information from Higher-Ed institutions by email.  This far outdistances the second preferred method of being contacted directly by an admissions representative at 20.9% followed by only 1.9% by phone and 1.0% via social media.

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With the College and University admissions and enrollment process becoming more and more competitive and complex with each and every year, it is crucial that higher-ed institutions learn from, and take advantage of information that can help them focus their recruitment strategies.  Making sure their Counselor outreach programs are effectively structured can be a key part of  enrollment success!

Do you work in the admissions office? We can help you connect with high school counselors to make sure they have the most up-to-date info to pass along to potential students. Contact us today.

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